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Arts for Health Podcasts

A series of entertaining and investigative episodes, tackling issues and exploring the diverse programming that makes up our Arts for Health work. Featuring the key players who make up the programme; artists, healthcare professionals, participants, manager and partners  Presenters, Liz Clark and Gavin Buckley lead the conversations – with Liz adding her unique perspective as a musician and artist working on the programme and Gavin as front of house staff at Uillinn observing the programme and the players.

The series portrays the complexity and the value of culture and the arts in healthcare, sharing the challenges and successes of innovation and creativity in a hospital setting from the different perspectives of those involved.

Episode 1

Sustaining Creativity and Ambition

Presenter Liz Clark gets the artists perspective in conversation with visual artists, composers and poet making art in long term care and day care settings, discussing the challenges and the rewards with the healthcare staff. Join us on twitter #artsforhealthpodcast

Episode 2

Being Both, Creative and Sterile 

Presenter Liz Clarks asks How do we strike the balance between structure and unpredictability in a clinical setting?  this episode looks at collaborative approaches between the artists, healthcare professionals and the participants to ensure a safe space for creativity. Join us on twitter #artsforhealthpodcast

Episode 3

Drivers and Barriers

Presenter Liz Clarks talks to healthcare workers, programme partners and management behind the scenes, asking how national policy and strategy influences the programme ? and if this is always a good thing. Join us on twitter #artsforhealthpodcast

Episode 4

Working Together

A special edition to celebrate #bealtaineathome2021.

Presenter Gavin Buckley brings together artists Sharon Dipity and Sarah Ruttle in conversation with Programme Manager, Justine Foster to explore what it means to work together – collaborating with each other, the staff and residents of the hospitals and healthcare settings in their most recent project Little Light Pocket Theatre.

Episode 5

Haiku Podcast

Presenter Gavin Buckley talks to artist Tess Leak about Haiku-Shelter, her work as part of the Compassionate Culture Network, a national initiative lead by the Irish Hospice Foundation Arts and Cultural Engagement Officer, Dominic Campbell. 7 artist-facilitators and support workers worked in 7 venues around the country inviting local communities to explore loss as un-lockdown happens.

Episode 6

Art of Wellbeing

Presenter Gavin Buckley releases the next episode in June 2022

On the Wireless Podcast Series: creativity & reminiscence in older age

Produced by Tadgh Ó Meachair and Joanna Hyde in association with Cork County Council and Creative Ireland

Here are two of five-episode series of conversations about creativity and reminiscence in older age spotlights the importance of creative expression and the many ways we can nurture featuring and about the Arts for Health Programme in West Cork. Click here to read more about On the Wireless podcast series.

On the Wireless Podcast

Episode 3: Arts For Health

From collaborative projects like the favourite poem of a Schull Hospital resident set to music by a violinist/composer over Zoom, to reimagining the Spanish lullaby one resident’s father used to play her as a child, this episode features musical and poetic excerpts from Arts for Health’s programmes.

On the Wireless Podcast

Episode 5: Michelle Collins And Arts For Health

In this episode Collins details her experience of working remotely with some of Marymount’s long-term residents in examining keening as a mechanism for reflecting on grief, loss, and bereavement and how memories of old traditions around grieving, funeral practices and loss emerged.

The episode also features contributions from Arts for Health artist Toma McCullim, who reveals her experience of working with and supporting older LGBTQ+ members of the community.

“We need to have more creative conversations about the way that older people live in our society and how best to have them fully integrated into our cultural lives.”